Monday, August 07, 2006

 

Mellifluous Hawaiian Language


Definition of mellifluous in dictionary: sweetly or smoothly flowing; dulcet; honeyed; flowing like or as with honey.

The Hawaiian language is mellifluous. Pure and simple honey. Listening to the Hawiian language spoken or even reading the Hawaiian dictionary, you feel the flow. You feel the honey. What's more, you have the sense of a language that captures a feeling-tone with their definitions.

For example, I randomly opened my reference book "Hawaiian Names, English Names" by Eileen M. Root to a page where my eyes rested upon this word: Ka'apeha which is defined thusly: "cloud of several colors reaching over the heavens, frequently a sign of rain, impressively big, even fat in a distinguished manner, influential and important." Isn't that definition amazing? The English language doesn't convey this same spiritual essence. You can almost imagine an ancient Hawaiian describing this type of cloud.

Although I only speak rudimentary ( everyday & familiar) Hawaiian phrases, I am enchanted with speaking and writing them. The words 'aloha' and 'mahalo' and 'malama pono' and 'E Komo Mai' roll off my tongue with ease as I'm sure they do for most people. Pure honey.

A good online resource for those who would like to know how their name translates into Hawaiian is The Coconut Boyz Hawaiian Dictionary. They also offer a fun tool which is this: write your message in virtual cyber sand and send it to someone via email.

Try on some words from the online Hawaiian dictionary and say them outloud. Then tell me how you feel. You might even go so far as to say this language is liquid light.
Comments:
I have never heard the hawaian language, but what you say seems to be really interesting. The only commun language which sounds melodious to me is italian the opera language. And that's not because I am married to an italian !
 
I have never heard the hawaian language, but what you say seems to be really interesting. The only commun language which sounds melodious to me is italian the opera language. And that's not because I am married to an italian !
 
I think you're a poet! Bobby
 
I've always felt that way about the hawaiian language. Just the way the syllables roll, you're right.

To Love, Honor and Dismay
 
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